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 111 3rd Street
 Sioux City, Iowa 51101
U. S. 712-224-ROCK
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CHRIS PORTER & BRANDON GOOCH

CHRIS PORTER

Best known for his third place finish on the season 4 of Last Comic Standing, .  Chris can also be seen on his own “Comedy Central Presents” special and “Live at Gotham”.  Chris Porter has been a touring comic since he was 23.  Since the beginning Chris’ raw energy and unique perspective has distinguished him as one of the elite comics in the industry.   Born and raised in Kansas City, Chris brings a true stand-up experience to his live shows.  There are no sound cues, no puppets, and no catch phrases.  Just gut wrenching laughter drawn from his own experience and observations.  Chris can also be seen on his own “Comedy Central Presents” special and “Live at Gotham”.

Buy Tickets
8:00 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA

BILLY GARDELL

BILLY GARDELL

Billy Gardell stars in the CBS Hit television series, MIKE& MOLLY as Officer Mike Biggs. MIKE & MOLLY garners approximately 13 million viewers every week.

Set to premiere this March, Billy is also the host of a new game show, MONOPOLY MILLIONAIRE’S CLUB, based on the hit board game and produced by the team behind Deal Or No Deal.

Before Mike and Molly, Gardell co-starred in the critically acclaimed television series “Lucky.” His other television credits include “Yes Dear” and “Judging Amy,” on the Network, “My Name is Earl,” “The Practice,” “Monk” and “Gary the Rat.”

He made his major motion picture debut alongside Anthony Quinn and Sylvester Stallone in “Avenging Angelo,” and had a memorable scene with Billy Bob Thornton in the Cohen Brother’s film “Bad Santa.” He also appeared in “You, Me & Dupree”, plays Umpire Haze in the baseball feature, “Undrafted” and appears in the upcoming Clint Eastwood directed film, “Jersey Boys.”

Gardell took the long road to Hollywood, stopping at every small town lounge, military base and comedy club along the way. His comedy act took him to Los Angeles where his dedication to acting, along with touring as a stand-up comedian, allowed him to grow consistently in both arenas. His stand-up show is a powerhouse. His grounded, down-to-earth point of view strikes a strong chord with American audiences. Stories about his rough childhood, wild adolescence and new family life are executed with the skill of a master craftsman.

As a standup comic, his comedy specials, "Billy Gardell: Halftime," premiered on Comedy Central and "Billy Gardell Presents Road Dogs" premiered on Showtime. In addition he makes regular appearances on "NFL Today" on CBS Sports.

A native of Pittsburgh who currently lives in Los Angeles, Gardell loves Steeler football, stand-up comedy and his wife Patty, and son Will.

Buy Tickets
7:00 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA

BILLY GARDELL

BILLY GARDELL

Billy Gardell stars in the CBS Hit television series, MIKE& MOLLY as Officer Mike Biggs. MIKE & MOLLY garners approximately 13 million viewers every week.

Set to premiere this March, Billy is also the host of a new game show, MONOPOLY MILLIONAIRE’S CLUB, based on the hit board game and produced by the team behind Deal Or No Deal.

Before Mike and Molly, Gardell co-starred in the critically acclaimed television series “Lucky.” His other television credits include “Yes Dear” and “Judging Amy,” on the Network, “My Name is Earl,” “The Practice,” “Monk” and “Gary the Rat.”

He made his major motion picture debut alongside Anthony Quinn and Sylvester Stallone in “Avenging Angelo,” and had a memorable scene with Billy Bob Thornton in the Cohen Brother’s film “Bad Santa.” He also appeared in “You, Me & Dupree”, plays Umpire Haze in the baseball feature, “Undrafted” and appears in the upcoming Clint Eastwood directed film, “Jersey Boys.”

Gardell took the long road to Hollywood, stopping at every small town lounge, military base and comedy club along the way. His comedy act took him to Los Angeles where his dedication to acting, along with touring as a stand-up comedian, allowed him to grow consistently in both arenas. His stand-up show is a powerhouse. His grounded, down-to-earth point of view strikes a strong chord with American audiences. Stories about his rough childhood, wild adolescence and new family life are executed with the skill of a master craftsman.

As a standup comic, his comedy specials, "Billy Gardell: Halftime," premiered on Comedy Central and "Billy Gardell Presents Road Dogs" premiered on Showtime. In addition he makes regular appearances on "NFL Today" on CBS Sports.

A native of Pittsburgh who currently lives in Los Angeles, Gardell loves Steeler football, stand-up comedy and his wife Patty, and son Will.

Buy Tickets
9:30 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA

ADAM CRAIG & JOHN KING

ADAM CRAIG
One of country music rising singer and songwriter.  Known for penning such songs as Close Your Eyes by Parmalee, Whiskey on My Breath by Love And Theft, World to Me by Dustin Lynch, Fast Lanes by Jason Aldean.  Based out of Nashville Adam Craig is about to take over the country music scene by storm. 

 

JOHN KING
In a musical landscape filled with overnight YouTube sensations and people being famous, for being famous, there is something very refreshing and trustworthy about an artist who counts by the number of miles on his tires, rather than the number of “likes” to keep him in the game.

It is that drive, paired with raw talent and business savvy, that took this young man out of a little mountain town in Georgia’s Habersham County and into the spotlight opening for award-winning artists, playing over 150 dates per year, prior to having a booking agent.

Buy Tickets
8:00 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA

CHRIS YOUNG

Chris Young has accomplished more by 29 than some artists do in a lifetime. Already a Grammy-nominated recording artist, he’s also a dynamic live performer consistently in demand, an international ambassador for his genre, a talented songwriter with six Number Ones to his name – by the way, he wrote four of them – and a handsome charmer to boot. Now, with the release of his fourth album, A.M., the man known for his classic baritone and melt-your-heart ballads knows how to have a good time, too. 

Still, when all is said and done, it only takes two words to sum up the career of Chris Young: Definitely country.

“I’ve always loved country music, and I really liked singing it as a kid,” Young remembers. “So I was like, ‘That’s what I want to do.’ I just kind of always knew.” His first record purchase was Keith Whitley’s L.A. to Miami, followed by the likes of Randy Travis, Tracy Lawrence and Brooks & Dunn. He sang so much around the house that he jokes his parents “blocked him out.” But as puberty approached, the young tenor found himself facing adversity for the first time. “I was singing all of Vince Gill’s stuff, and then my voice changed,” Young laughs. “For about a year there, I thought, ‘Oh my God, I’m ruined. It’s the end of the world!’ And then I realized I could sing Randy Travis songs. It worked out well.”

That’s something of an understatement for the Murfreesboro, TN native. Blessed with parents who encouraged his art, Young soon found his way into musical theater, jazz training, and six years of classical voice, which honed his emerging baritone into something truly special. In his early teens, Young convinced his mom to drive him into Nashville so he could sit in with bands and work with local songwriters; by 16, he’d formed a band with some older guys from Middle Tennessee State University, and they started playing George Strait and Garth Brooks covers in whatever clubs would have them. “I was entirely too young to be playing in bars,” Young says. “I would have these big Xs in chunky black marker on my hands. I can’t imagine we were that good, but really, that was me enjoying the heck out of what I did.”

Everyone starts somewhere, and Young was starting to hone his craft. “People were telling me to learn to write songs,” he says. “I’d written poems and stuff, but I didn’t really know how. Which is funny, because you don’t necessarily have to know how to write a song. You just sit down and create something. You make it up.” He cut his first independent record after high school, using his own money to fund 500 or so CDs and take himself on a short tour of Florida, where he played mostly Borders bookstores. “One day, I played to three people,” Young remembers. “Two were playing chess, and the other person was reading a book. When I said, ‘Well, this will be my last song,’ the lady reading the book clapped.” 

If you’re starting to think, Wow, this kid has a work ethic, you’re getting the idea. Three semesters at Nashville’s Belmont University and a short stint at MTSU taught him he wasn’t cut out for college life. Instead, he picked up more than a diploma interning for a song publishing company owned by Laura Stroud, the wife of his future producer, James Stroud. Soon after, he scored an offer for a regular weekly gig as the frontman for the house band at Cowboys Dancehall in Arlington, one of the biggest country clubs in Texas. He dropped out of college, and began earning an equivalent of a Ph.D in the honky tonks of Texas, where he played more than 150 dates a year. He was 20. “We would open for anybody who came through – Lonestar, Dwight Yoakam. That’s where I got real experience working with a band, lights, in-ear monitors, everything. I’m pretty lucky,” he admits. “When I dropped out of college and moved to Texas, my parents didn’t disown me.” He soon returned to Tennessee and landed a recording contract with RCA Nashville. “I loved that label,” Young says. “It was a heritage label that some of my favorite artists had been on. Keith Whitley. John Anderson. I think it’s where I was supposed to be.” 

Four albums and seven years later, Young looks back with some amazement. “It’s wild to think that I’ve been around that long,” he says. “People always told me, ‘Hey, the record deal isn’t the finish line.’ It’s the beginning of the work,” he says. “I probably did four full radio tours starting out, just going around saying, ‘Hey, still here… not going away…’ I think RCA saw my work ethic. They kept me around.” Ask Young today how it felt as the momentum began to turn, and he’ll say, with typical humility, “After the first hit [“Gettin' You Home (The Little Black Dress Song)”], it was like, ‘Okay, thank God I made enough money that I can buy a really small place to live.’ After the second hit [“The Man I Want To Be”], it was a mixture of validation and just relief. ‘Okay, I’m not a one hit wonder.’”  Far from it: He would chart five consecutive Number One singles, co-writing four of them, and receiving plenty of Grammy, ACM, and CMA nominations along the way.

Buy Tickets
6:00 pm
Battery Park Sioux City, IA

BATTERY PARK BACKSTAGE LOUNGE

CHRIS YOUNG

BATTERY PARK BACKSTAGE LOUNGE
EXPERIENCE BATTERY PARK LIKE A ROCK STAR IN OUR BACKSTAGE LOUNGE.  ENJOY THE CONCERT IN STYLE AND COMFORT WITH OUR EXCLUSIVE LOUNGE NEXT TO THE STAGE FEATURING A PRIVATE BAR, FOOD STATION, AND MUCH MORE. 

THE BACKSTAGE LOUNGE PASS INCLUDES:

  • An exclusive Batter Park Lanyard

  • Two (2) FREE drink tickets

  • Access to our private Red Bull bar

  • 2015 Signature Battery Park signature cup

  • Food Bar

MUST PURCHASE TICKET TO THE CONCERT TO GAIN ACCESS TO THE BACKSTAGE LOUNGE.

PASS DOES NOT GAIN YOU ALL ACCESS OR ANY MEET & GREET PRIVILEGES WITH THE ARTISTS.  

Buy Tickets
7:00 pm
Battery Park Sioux City, IA

THE VIRTUAL COMICALITY TOUR starring RICHARD REESE

RICHARD REESE

Stand-up comedian Richard Reese exploded onto the comedy scene after being voted "Most Entertaining" at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. With his speed of light wit and original mind, he creates obscure one-liners, cartoonish imagery and absurd thoughts on life that simply pop blood vessels with authority. In 2007 Richard became an online finalist for the Purina Pet Comedy Challenge. Along with winning the 2008 Great American Comedy Festival, 2013 saw the release of his first comedy special "Smoke, Jokes & Lasers" which was followed by the 2015 release of "Always Laugh Forever Before You Die Yesterday." This rising young comedian/actor continues to impress audiences throughout the country.

The Virtual Comicality Tour

“The simulation has been set and the program is up and running…”

Comedian Richard Reese, alongside a group of cyborgian misfits; join forces and infiltrate the digital realm to provide some imagined laughs. Experience the unreal.

Buy Tickets
8:00 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA

ACE FREHLEY

ACE FREHLEY

Like a shooting star headed toward earth from another solar system, Ace Frehley operates in his own musical galaxy. He’s a musical maverick and iconoclast adored by millions of fans around the world. Through his seminal work with KISS and as a solo artist, Ace Frehley is championed as one of the most influential guitar players of the last four decades and his impact on popular music is immeasurable. With his smash 1978 solo album and post-KISS work including 2009 Anomaly, and his current Top Ten Billboard 200 debut Space Invader, Frehley continues to be the best selling member of the original band.

 

 

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8:00 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA

MOLLY HATCHET

MOLLY HATCHET

Jacksonville’s Molly Hatchet meld loud hard rock boogie with guitar jam-oriented Southern rock. Formed in 1975, the group’s original lineup featured three guitarists — Dave Hlubek, Steve Holland, and Duane Roland — plus vocalist Danny Joe Brown, bassist Banner Thomas, and drummer Bruce Crump. They recorded a self-titled debut album in 1978, which quickly went platinum; the follow-up, Flirtin’ with Disaster, was even more successful, selling over two million copies. Brown left the group in 1980 after the constant touring became too tiresome; he was replaced by Jimmy Farrar for Beatin’ the Odds, but Farrar’s voice was less immediately identifiable, and Molly Hatchet’s commercial appeal began a slow decline. The band experimented with horns on Take No Prisoners, but Farrar left for a solo career soon afterwards. Brown rejoined the band in 1982, but the ensuing album, No Guts…No Glory, flopped, and guitarist Hlubek insisted on revamping Molly Hatchet’s sound. After The Deed Is Done, a straightforward pop/rock album, the group took some time off in 1985 while its Double Trouble Live album, a collection of some of its best-known songs, was released. Molly Hatchet returned in 1989 without Hlubek for an album of straight, polished AOR, Lightning Strikes Twice. Not even the group’s fan base bought the record, and Molly Hatchet disbanded shortly afterward. They reunited in the mid-’90s as an active touring outfit, releasing Devil’s Canyon, their first record since Lightning Strikes Twice, in 1996. Continuing to recapture the style of their glory days, Silent Reign of Heroes followed in 1998, and Kingdom of XII appeared in early 2001. A slew of live recordings appeared during the next few years, and the band’s studio follow-up, Warriors of the Rainbow Bridge, was released in 2005. Their 13th album, Justice, appeared in 2010.

Buy Tickets
8:00 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA

GEORGE THOROGOOD & THE DESTROYERS

GEORGE THOROGOOD & THE DESTROYERS

In 1973, a barely-out-of-his-teens Wilmington guitarist piled his gear into the drummer’s Chevy van to play their very first gig at a University of Delaware dorm.  More than 4 decades, over 8,000 live shows, and some 15 million albums sold worldwide later, that same maverick guitar-slinger is still making electrifying music, still thrilling audiences, and still the most bad-to-the-bone performer in rock.

It’s 2015, and George Thorogood & The Destroyers are Badder Than Ever.

For George and his longtime band – Jeff Simon (drums, percussion), Bill Blough (bass guitar), Jim Suhler (rhythm guitar) and Buddy Leach (saxophone) – their new Badder Than Ever Tour is indestructible proof that staying true to yourself and the music can still mean something. And with a catalog of classics that includes “Who Do You Love”, “I Drink Alone”, “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer”, “Move It On Over”, “Bad To The Bone” and more, being able to share it with audiences is what will always matter.

“When I was 16, I was going to school and playing Little League but nothing felt comfortable to me,” George says. “The first moment I picked up the guitar, it felt so right that it almost scared me. The fact that I couldn’t sing, play or write a song didn’t matter. I’d learn to do all that soon enough. But by having a knack for this thing and feeling relaxed doing it, I knew I was halfway home. I love to perform live, and I’m lucky to be able to do it on a level that our music and reputation have taken us to. To this day, I consider my job description to be ‘live rock performer’.”

Surprisingly, Thorogood began his career as a solo acoustic act. “I was more of a Robert Johnson/Elmore James type country-blues player,” he explains. “I wasn’t very good at it, but I’d gotten enough feedback from artists like Brownie McGhee and Willie Dixon who thought I had something going. But I knew I needed more.” George called high-school friend and drummer Jeff Simon, and with the addition of a bass player – as well as Jeff’s van – the electric trio soon graduated from basement rehearsals to local gigs. “We knew there was still time for one supercharged boogie blues combo to make it. We relocated to Boston, and toured New England and the Delaware Valley non-stop. Crowds loved us. The acts we were opening for, like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, loved us. We were playing great, but still couldn’t get a record deal. Back then, a band without a record deal was like an actor without a SAG card. We couldn’t earn more than $200 a night.”

As Big Bill Broonzy said, the blues is a natural fact. If you don’t live it, you don’t have it. “1974 to 1977 was rough,” George remembers. “Everything seemed stacked against us. We were always getting ripped off, our gear got stolen, our rent was doubled and we were evicted from our band house.” By this time, Bill Blough had joined The Destroyers on bass and the band signed a deal with the Cambridgebased independent bluegrass label Rounder Records. “But the album sat on the shelf for 18 months. And the day it was finally released,” George says with a laugh, “was the day Elvis died.”

Nevertheless, that self-titled and now-classic debut would soon be certified Gold. And for audiences and radio alike, the band instantly embodied – and continues to define– powerhouse rock with bar band roots, unchained attitude and a fierce love of its country, blues and R&B history. Over the course of sixteen studio albums (including six Gold and two Platinum discs), they would storm the charts by putting their own stamp on nuggets by Hank Williams, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry, John Lee Hooker, Elmore James and more, while simultaneously delivering hit GT originals that crackle with humor and swagger. “I’ve always balanced one against the other,” George explains, “and I follow my heart as far as what I can do. You don’t ask Woody Allen to make a western and you can’t expect Clint Eastwood to do Shakespeare. You find what you’re good at and stick to it.  Let’s face it; ‘Get A Haircut’ isn’t a song for Carly Simon. It’s for Thorogood.” As for his signature certified classic “Bad To The Bone”, George knows the simple truth of his definitive badass anthem. “It’s the ultimate fantasy of the cool tough guy,” he says. “I wrote ‘Bad To The Bone’ to perform it live for the rest of my life.”

In fact, ask anyone who’s seen a GT&D performance – from that first show at Lane Hall, through legendary appearances on SNL and Live Aid, the opening slot on the Rolling Stones historic ’81 tour, their own record-breaking 50/50 tour, or any of their current 100+ shows per year – and it’s ferociously clear that the band’s reputation as worldwide road warriors remains untouchable. “When we play, whether it’s a great old theater, a shiny new casino, an outdoor festival, wherever, we have fun on stage.  We give the fans a great show. Most of all, we’re making a living doing what we love and people love what we're doing.”

Ultimately, the 2015 Badder Than Ever tour is 50% celebration, 50% declaration and 100% Thorogood throwdown. But after 4-plus decades as one of the most consistent– and consistently unique – careers in rock, can a guitar-slinger still at the top of his game choose a moment that brings it all home? “Stan Musial was once asked, ‘What was the greatest day of your career?’ And Stan said ‘Every day when I walk onto the field is the greatest day.’ I feel the same way,” George says. “Every night when I walk out on that stage is the highlight of my career. I hit that first chord, the band kicks in, and we hear the audience respond. That’s the rush. Over 40 years into this, and every night that's still the only moment that matters.”

For George Thorogood & The Destroyers – and for rock & roll  

Buy Tickets
8:00 pm
Anthem Sioux City, IA
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